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Old 08-22-2014, 09:57 PM   #17
blue enigma
Accelerator Technician
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 265
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam Beckett Fan View Post
So when he asks her in The Leap Back if he'd ever made her feel betrayed and Catch a Falling Star instantly jumps out at the viewer (or at least at me) which was personal not in any way related to the leap, one must lift an eyebrow at her response. The probability that she knew better than to fault him for his memory loss and her own role in that as well as a possibility that she didn't want to put that guilt on him doesn't make much of a difference. The line still doesn't come across believably anymore than their relationship in general does.
Yeah, I don't think she really meant it. I think she just said that with the idea that it was over and done with and she wanted to move on and enjoy having her husband back. Why bring up or dwell on painful stuff when you can be making love under the stars? But I don't buy it that she didn't feel hurt by his actions, even if he couldn't help it because of his memory loss. She just chose not to dwell on it or burden him.

On the other hand, this episode was written by Bellisario himself, and it may have been wishful thinking on his part.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam Beckett Fan View Post
If there was another criticism I've got about The Leap Back, it's her line "I don't care" in regards to Al's peril. That gave her a contradicting selfishness that is understandably maddening to some folks, even myself. The same could be said of "It isn't fair Sam".
Two things about the "I don't care" line: first, I think that once again this is a case where Bellisario brought his own stuff into the writing; but second, taking the line itself at face value, I don't think Donna literally meant that she didn't care about Al and I don't think she was willing to allow him to die either. She was reacting in the moment. She was extremely upset, and she had every right to be. Her husband was lost to her, for all intents and purposes, for four years, and then when she finally got him back it wasn't even twenty-four hours and he had to leave her again, possibly (and as we know, definitely) to never return - and as was pointed out in the specific thread for the episode, Sam treated her pretty badly as he was about to leave, completely ignoring her until she made him tell her what he was doing.

As for the "It isn't fair, Sam" line: she's absolutely right. It isn't fair. Sam has been unfair. He is a good, caring man for the most part, but he's been unfair to the people closest to him, especially Donna.

Sam is selfish too, but people don't define the character by his selfishness; it's just one facet of a complex, well-realized character. Because Donna was so badly developed as a character I think a lot of people end up defining her by this one scene (and in fact she almost reads to me as nothing more than another trophy for Sam, like his Nobel prize, rather than a fully fleshed-out human character; I don't dislike the character, but I very much disliked the way the character was handled by the two writers of the episodes where she appears).
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